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Police vehicle set ablaze in Kashmir during pro-Rohingya demonstration in Anantnag

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Reports reaching here said that dozens of protesters after congregational prayers took out a protest rally to protest against what they termed the persecution of Muslims in Myanmar.

Eyewitnesses said that police used massive force including teargas shells to disperse the protesters who pelted stones on them. Intense clashes were going in the area when this report was filed.

Kashmiris to hoist black flags and wear black badges to protest brutalities on Rohingya Muslims

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He appealed to the state employees to stand against this “barbarism” and wear black badges on arms and hoist black flags on all the government institutions and offices on September 8, as a mark of protest against this ethnic genocide. Keep Reading

A short timeline of Rohingya crisis

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As the Myanmarese security forces continue their ethnic cleansing attempt, with hundreds of reports of rape, shooting, fatal beating and burning, more than 120,000 Rohingya Muslims are fleeing to Bangladesh. Also over 30,000 are trapped in highlands of the Rakhin province without any food or water. Keep Reading

Shame: Aung San Suu Kyi no longer deserves her Nobel Peace Prize

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According to the United Nations latest report, more than 123,000 refugees have fled to neighboring Bangladesh in less than two weeks to escape persecution. Yet amid a crisis increasingly described as genocide, Myanmar’s state counselor and former Nobel Peace Prize winner, Aung San Suu Kyi, has remained conspicuously silent.

Reports keep flooding in of mass killings carried out by Burmese security forces, as well as torture, rape and the systematic razing of Rohingya villages. Burmese authorities say they are carrying out “clearance operations” against extremist “Bengali” insurgents — “Bengali” being a term the government uses to suggest Rohingyas are foreign interlopers rather than native Burmese.

The Rohingya have long been victims of state-sponsored discrimination and abuse ? including what the U.N. has deemed possible crimes against humanity. Security officials have carried out gruesome violence, including killings, rapes and arson, against the Rohingya community in recent days.

The strange reaction of Aung San Suu Kyi to the genocide of Muslims

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In her first reaction to the events, Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the ruling party in Myanmar and the Nobel Peace Prize winner, who was criticized by the media for her silence against the killing of the Rohingya minority, declared that her supports all people in the state of Rakhine.

She also criticized the “a huge iceberg of misinformation” that are aligned with the interests of the terrorists.

According to a post sent by Aung San Suu Kyi´s office to Facebook on Wednesday, said she had spoken with Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdo?an about the crisis that he has repeatedly called a “genocide”.

Over the past two weeks, more than 123,000 Rohingya Muslims have escaped from Rakhine, northern Myanmar, and have taken refuge in Bangladesh, according to the United Nations.

She said the government “had already started defending all the people in Rakhine in the best way possible and expressed that there should be no misinformation to create trouble between the two countries”.

“That kind of fake information which was inflicted on the deputy prime minister was simply the tip of a huge iceberg of misinformation calculated to create a lot of problems between different communities and with the aim of promoting the interest of the terrorists,” the statement said.

Meanwhile, Human Rights Watch announced two days ago that more than 30,000 Rohingya runaways escaped from Myanmar troops to the mountain of Rakhine and are trapped there without access to water, food, and health services.

Aung San Suu Kyi’s shameful silence as more than 125.000 refugees flee Myanmar

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United Nations estimating that more than 123,000 refugees have fled to neighboring Bangladesh in less than two weeks to escape persecution. Yet amid a crisis increasingly described as genocide, Myanmar’s state counselor and former Nobel Peace Prize winner, Aung San Suu Kyi, has remained conspicuously silent.

The Muslim minority group mostly lives in Rakhine state, where they have limited rights and are classified as illegal immigrants rather than citizens. They have long been victims of state-sponsored discrimination and abuse ? including what the U.N. has deemed possible crimes against humanity.

In addition to those who have fled the country, tens of thousands of Rohingya are internally displaced. Security officials have carried out gruesome violence, including killings, rapes and arson, against the Rohingya community in recent days.

CEO of the advocacy group Fortify Rights, Matthew Smith, told NPR that “The brutality is unthinkable, [Myanmar’s security forces] are killing children. They’re killing women. They’re killing the elderly. They’re killing able-bodied men and boys. It’s indiscriminate.”

But Suu Kyi, a former political prisoner and activist during Myanmar’s decades-long military dictatorship, has kept quiet in the face of mounting international pressure to address the unfolding crisis. Her inaction has even stirred discussion of revoking the Nobel Peace Prize she won in 1991 for “her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights.”

In a rare interview with the BBC in April, Suu Kyi denied that ethnic cleansing was taking place in Rakhine state, calling it “too strong a term.”

Suu Kyi declared that she wanted to run for president in Myanmar’s 2015 election, but the country’s constitution barred her from doing so because she had married a foreigner and had foreign children. The role of state counselor, which is similar to prime minister, was instead established for her in 2016.

Calls for Suu Kyi to take action have come from concerned parties around the world, including 20-year-old activist Malala Yousafzai.

Aung San Suu Kyi: A Nobel Peace prize winner who is now leading a genocide

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The de facto leader of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, fought back Tuesday by calling reports of genocide against the country’s Rohingya minority in Rakhine state “fake news” and the “tip of a huge iceberg of misinformation.”

The Rohingya are stateless Muslims in an overwhelmingly Buddhist country that has long been hostile to their presence. There are an estimated 1 million Rohingya living in Myanmar, where they are not recognized by the government as an official group and are denied citizenship.

Human Rights Watch, a New York-based rights organization, has analyzed satellite data from Rakhine state that it says shows the burning of several villages.

Suu Kyi’s comments were posted in a readout of a call on the Facebook page of the office of Myanmar’s state counselor, her official title. She said “fake” news and photographs of the crisis in Rakhine state were being used to promote the interest of “terrorists.”

The current backlash against Suu Kyi is a startling reversal for a revered international icon who spent 15 years under house arrest and was given the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 for her “non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights.”

An online petition calling for the Nobel Committee to revoke her Peace Prize has received more than 350,000 supporters so far.

Demonstrations against Myanmar have been held in Australia, India and Indonesia, where several thousands took to the streets of Jakarta on Wednesday and burned pictures of Suu Kyi.

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